The Incredible Rise of Diabetes in the United States

NPR had a great post dissecting the rise of diabetes in America in the last twenty years. Check out the graphic representation of the increase, it looks pretty frightening visually:

1995:

Diabetes prevalence in 1995

2000:

Diabetes prevalence in 2000

2005:

Diabetes prevalence in 2005

And, finally, 2010:

Basically: Yikes. And Happy Thanksgiving!

Countries Facing a Critical Healthcare Worker Shortage

A fantastic interactive graphic by the Guardian highlights which countries are in the most dire straits. Check it out here, and hover over a country’s name to get the statistics.

Some of the facts I found most interesting:

The Democratic Republic of the Congo has one physician and five nurses per 10,000 people and the infant mortality rate is 199 deaths before age five per 1,000 births.

Tanzania has less than one physician and two nurses per 10,000 people and an infant mortality rate of 103.

Chad also has less than one physician and three nurses per 10,000 people, and an infant mortality rate of 209.

Highest infant mortality rate? Afghanistan.

Check it out.

Scientific American: We Are Getting Fatter and Drunker

Scientific American released a couple of interesting interactive graphs and infographics showing the rise of poor health behaviors among Americans, focusing on the changes between 1995 – 2010. Pretty interesting findings – overall, Americans are drinking more heavily, binge drinking more frequently, and overeating more regularly – but we are also smoking less, overall.

Vermont was the worst state for heavy drinking in 2010 (Tennessee had the fewest heavy drinkers), Wisconsin was the worst for binge drinking (Tennessee again had the fewest!), West Virginia was the worst for tobacco use (Utah had the fewest smokers), Mississippi was the worst for obesity (Colorado had the lowest obesity rates), and Oregon did the best in terms of exercising and physical activity (Mississippi was the worst).

You can toggle between health behaviors divided by regions in this piece, and here is the infographic showing the trends:

Image via Scientific American